Grinding wheel hardness selection

- May 03, 2018-

Grinding wheel hardness selection

The hardness of the grinding wheel is the degree of difficulty that the grinding wheel falls off the surface of the grinding wheel due to the grinding force. The hardness of the grinding wheel is expressed in terms of hardness and hardness. The hardness of the grinding wheel is different from the hardness of the abrasive grain.

When the grinding wheel is selected, it is necessary to pay attention to the proper hardness. If it is too hard, the blunt abrasive grains will not fall off in time, and a large amount of heat will be generated and the workpiece will be burned. If the grinding wheel is too soft, the abrasive grains will fall off too quickly and will not fully function.

The principle of selecting the hardness of the grinding wheel

1. The harder the workpiece, the softer the grinding wheel.


2. The greater the interface between the grinding wheel and the workpiece, the softer the wheel selection.


3. Hard grinding wheels should be selected for fine grinding and forming grinding to maintain the necessary shape accuracy of the grinding wheel.


4. The relationship between the hardness of the grinding wheel and the size of the grain: The grinding wheel with the larger grain size generally chooses a softer grinding wheel in order to avoid the grinding wheel being blocked by wear debris.


5. Workpiece materials: When grinding non-ferrous metals, rubber, resins and other soft materials, softer grinding wheels should be used

The hardness of the grinding wheel refers to the degree of bonding between the abrasives. The amount of combined abrasive in the grinding wheel determines the hardness of the grinding wheel. The user needs to flexibly select the hardness of the grinding wheel according to the requirements of the specific grinding (such as the feed amount, roughness, material).

The general principle of grinding wheel hardness is:

Softer hardness

1) The coarse grinding with a large amount of feed.

2) Grinding areas with large contact surfaces.

3) Harder workpieces, such as high hardness tool steels and hard alloys.

4) The workpiece has poor thermal resistance and prevents surface burns.

Harder hardness

1) Fine grinding with a small amount of feed.

2) Extend the life of the grinding wheel.

3) The softer workpiece.

4) When the grinding contact surface is small or narrow.